Parthenon Software Group


Python in Portland

Posted by: Jessica Wilson 5 years, 2 months ago

All software development companies are always on the lookout for the best resources to accomplish their goals. In many cases, Python has become one of those tools. A Google search for developer positions certainly yields multiple requests for experience in Python. Why? What's the draw? Python is known for a design that emphasizes code readability with fewer lines of code than other languages. Thus, a developer can work more quickly and efficiently within a safe and secure language. And that's only skimming the surface of what Python is/can do. As such, the prevalence of this open source language has spread across the world including in Portland, Oregon.


As those who live in Portland can attest, it takes something especially noteworthy for the city to receive more than a passing reference. The influence of Python within the city has become one of those factors. Portland is known for its startup scene and given all the different projects and stages of development going on, it makes sense that many startups -think along the lines of Urban Airship, New Relic, Parthenon Software Group, etc- make heavy use of Python.

In addition, there’s ample opportunity to learn about Python and how to code with it. There are several recognized user groups across the global. The Portland Python User Group is included on the list. This group meets on a regular basis to discuss and promote the use of Python. And you don’t have to be an expert to participate. Those new to Python are more than welcome to attend.

Then there's the fact that there's a large open source community residing in Portland. Consider the fact that North American PyCon (Community-Run Python Conference) founder, Steve Holden calls Portland home. Additionally, members of the Django core team also reside in Portland.

Speaking of open source, Portland’s status as an open source city certainly doesn't hurt Python's prevalence.

Now, I could dive deeper into all of the instances of Python in Portland, but that seems like overkill. In the end, it's still about overall acceptance of Python, it's recurrence in multiple spheres of the tech scene and the growing number of its proponents.